More Sites

Japanese pickle primed to be next superfood

Sam Downing
Thursday, November 7, 2013
Suguki (Getty Images)

This Japanese pickle might not look appetising, but it could join goji berries, kale and coconut water as the next big superfood.

Scientists have discovered that the suguki, a pickled turnip popular in Japan, harbours bacteria that can boost the body's immune system and ward off the flu.

"Our results show that when a particular strain of Lactobacillus brevis is eaten by mice, it has protective effects against influenza virus infection," said lead researcher Naoko Waki, from Japanese food and beverage company Kagome.

Her team's next step will be demonstrating that the bacteria has the same benefits for humans as it does for mice. A probiotic drink rich in the bacteria is currently being trialled.

Suguki lovers have talked up its health benefits. It's not yet known why the bacteria in it is so effective, though it's thought to be linked to a layer of sugars that protects it from stomach acids.

Source: ScienceDaily

More inspiration

Fruit and veg countdown to health and happinessFruit and veg countdown to health and happinessIf you're confused about how much fruit and veg you should have in your diet, you've got good reason to be. There's plenty of professional advice out there and the advice is being applied to not just... Sandwiches surprise major source of dietary saltSandwiches surprise major source of dietary saltIn something of a health warning for sanger lovers Down Under, US researchers have found Americans get as much as 46 percent of their recommended dietary intake of salt in sandwiches daily. Juices with more sugar than Red Bull revealedJuices with more sugar than Red Bull revealedJuice drinkers, if you think you're quenching your thirst with a healthy alternative to soft drink, prepare yourself for a sugary shock. Our survey of drinks confirms earlier research that some...
advertisement
Get great recipes on your mobile wherever you are.
Scroogiest scientific way to cut a cakeScroogiest scientific way to cut a cake