Neil Perry’s classic fried rice

Neil Perry’s classic fried rice

Ingredients

  • 555 g (1 lb 4 oz/3 cups) cooked rice
  • 3 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 4 large green king prawns (shrimp), peeled, deveined and roughly chopped
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped ginger
  • 150 g (5 1/2 oz) Chinese-style barbecue pork, roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon light soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon yellow bean soy sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons oyster sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 3 spring onions (scallions), cut into julienne
  • a pinch of freshly ground white pepper

  • You too can become a 'Star chef' by helping Neil and many others raise funds for the Starlight Children’s Foundation. Neil Perry is an ambassador of Serving up Smiles.

Preparation method

Heat a wok until just smoking. Add 1 tablespoon of the peanut oil and, when hot, stir-fry the prawns until just cooked, then remove.



Reheat the wok, add the eggs and move them around the wok gently until just set.
Turn the egg out onto a plate and roughly chop with your wok spoon.

Wipe the wok clean and reheat with the remaining peanut oil until just smoking. Add the garlic and ginger and stir-fry until fragrant, then add the pork and cook for 1 minute.

Add the rice and stir-fry for another minute, then return the prawns to the wok.

Add the soy sauces, sea salt, sugar, oyster sauce and sesame oil, and stir-fry until the rice is coated with sauce. Add the egg and spring onions and toss together.

Transfer to a serving bowl and sprinkle with ground pepper to serve.





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