Turmeric and coconut poached barramundi

Real~Living
Cooking time
Less than 30 minutes
Cuisine
Asian
Serves
4
Type
Easy
Seafood
4 stars - based on 2 reviews
Turmeric and coconut poached barramundi
Photography and props styling Katie Quinn Davies
By 

Ingredients

  • 2 lemongrass stalks, outer layers removed, trimmed & sliced finely
  • 3 coriander stalks, roots trimmed & leaves separated
  • 2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 2 tsp ground ginger
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • 3 tsp grated palm sugar
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 brown onion, chopped finely
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 cup fish stock
  • 4 x 180g frozen barramundi fillets, thawed (we used frozen as it cost $16.97 a kilo, but you can use fresh – about $33 a kilo – if you prefer)
  • 1 bunch choy sum, trimmed & cut into 10cm lengths
  • 2 green onions (shallots), sliced
  • Steamed rice & lime wedges, to serve

Equipment

  • Sharp knife
  • Grater
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Large wide-based saucepan with lid
  • Spoon
  • Ladle

Preparation method

Make spice paste Place lemongrass and coriander roots in mortar and crush to a paste with pestle. Add ground turmeric, ginger, cumin, palm sugar and fish sauce. Grind to combine.

Make sauce Heat vegetable oil in saucepan over medium-high heat. Fry paste for 2 mins until fragrant. Stir in onion and cook for 3 mins. Add coconut milk and fish stock; bring to a simmer.

Cook fish Gently lay fish into sauce and cover saucepan with lid. Reduce heat to medium and poach fish for 8 mins until nearly cooked. With 4 mins to go, add choy sum, re-cover pan and cook until tender.

Serve Garnish fish with coriander leaves and green onions. Serve with steamed rice and lime wedges.
This dish is great for those who love fragrant Asian flavours, but could do without the spicy heat.

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