Beef in red wine

Recipe~Finder
Cooking time
More than 2 hours
Cuisine
Modern Australian
Healthy options
Healthy
Low carb
Serves
6
Type
Family
Beef in red wine
Photography: Teny Aghamalian
By 

Ingredients

  • 1kg beef, cut into large cubes (see tip)
  • 1½ cups (375ml) red wine
  • ¼ cup (60ml) rice bran oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • bouquet garni (bay leaf, thyme and parsley)
  • 125g thickly cut pancetta, cubed (optional)
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, thickly sliced
  • 2 tomatoes, peeled, quartered
  • ½ cup (125ml) beef stock
  • 1-2 strips orange rind
  • chopped parsley, mashed potato, to serve

Preparation method



Place beef in a large bowl with wine, 1 tablespoon of oil, garlic and bouquet garni. Toss to coat, cover and refrigerate for 3 hours or overnight to marinate.

Heat remaining oil in a flameproof casserole pan on high. Cook pancetta for 3 minutes, stirring, until fat is transparent.

Meanwhile, remove beef from marinade. Pour marinade with bouquet garni into a small saucepan and boil rapidly until reduced by half. Add beef to pancetta and cook for 5 minutes, until brown. Add onion and carrot and cook for 5 minutes. Stir through reduced marinade with bouquet garni. Add tomato, stock and orange rind and season.

Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer gently, skimming any surface fat, for 2-2½ hours, until beef is very tender. Scatter with parsley and serve with mashed potato.




Tips: beef cheek or shoulder are great for this dish, but aren't always available. Try chuck, gravy, shin, or even blade steak.

Make this the day before and chill so that the fat can set on top and be removed.

For thicker gravy, combine 30g butter with 1½ tablespoons flour, stir into sauce, bring to boil and simmer for a few minutes.


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