Middle Eastern meatloaf

Middle Eastern meatloaf

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 3/4 cup (150g) crushed wheat (fine bulgur or burghul)
  • 1 medium (150g) onion, quartered
  • 500g lean lamb mince
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons pine nuts
  • 1 cup lightly packed flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 1 teaspoon sumac (available in the spice aisle of most supermarkets)
  • SPICED ONIONS
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 medium (450g) brown onions, sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • pinch ground allspice
  • 2 tablespoons pine nuts, roasted

Preparation method

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (160°C fan-forced). Lightly oil a 24cm springform tin, line base with baking paper. Spread 1 tablespoon of the oil over the base.

2. Rinse the wheat in a fine sieve under cold water; drain well.

3. Process onion until chopped finely. Add the lamb, salt, pepper and cinnamon and wheat; process until a thick paste forms. Press the lamb mixture over the base of the prepared tin. Brush with the remaining oil. Sprinkle with the pine nuts; press lightly into the surface. Bake for 30 minutes.

4. SPICED ONIONS: Meanwhile, heat oil in a medium frying pan. Add onion; cook, covered, over medium heat, for 15 minutes. Uncover, cook, stirring occasionally, for a further 10 minutes or until onion is soft but not coloured. Add spices; season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Cook, stirring, until fragrant. Stir in pine nuts.

5. Top cooked meatloaf with Spiced Onions, parsley and sumac. Serve with a cucumber and tomato salad, if desired.

Uncooked meatloaf suitable to freeze. Not suitable to microwave.

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